Wednesday, 6 December 2017

Dairy farm- Oh what a day!

Today half of Tautoru went on an exciting journey to visit Stacey and Andrew Faith on their dairy farm in Te Horo. (Tomorrow the other half are off for a visit).
First of all we had a looooong trip on the bus (according to the children), and had to use some perseverance and patience because it took a while to get beyond "Are we there yet?" Once we arrived we were straight into the milking shed. What an experience!
Stacey asked us to choose some children who sat nicely on the bus, and some of them got chosen to go down into the pit and put the cups on the teats of the cows. It was a very messy job! Lots of cow poo descended on those in the pit. As Jackie said, "If this is what the good kids get, what is in store for the others?" (Actually they had all sat and travelled nicely, but many were relieved they hadn't been chosen!)๐Ÿ˜Š๐Ÿ˜Š๐Ÿ˜Š  

The smell was a bit different to school! It was tricky to find some appreciation of beauty and excellence in that.
We used a growth mindset when we were attaching the cups, and zest was on the cards if there was any signs of droppings from above! 
We watched the milk go into the container attached to the cups, and then it went through pipes into a big cylinder and then onto the vat to be stored until the milk tanker came. There was lots of new learning today.
After the cows were milked the cups had to be washed so they would be ready for next time.
See the big vat for storing the milk. Then we were off to the calf and chicken sheds.
It was a bit of a walk on a hot day, but there was no stopping us in our gumboots.


Stacey feeds all the calves. Sometimes she has as many as 250 calves to feed.

She uses the calfateria to help (called the "milk bar"). Plenty of calves can all be fed at the same time using this machine.
We got a chance to see the chicken and pat one.

Then we were in a rush to get back to the milking shed because the milk tanker driver needed to get on his way, so Andrew and Stacey gave us a ride......



Well that was another experience for the day!
The milk tanker driver attached the hose to collect the milk from the vat. It all gets calculated by a computer in the truck to check the quality and quantity. They get paid for the quality of the milk they produce.

                         Over 6,000 litres got collected today from Stacey and Andrew's farm today.

The milk goes off to the factory so that it can be pasteurised and bottled.

Then it was back onto the bus for us.
And off to Te Horo school, where we were able to wash our hands (phew!), eat our lunch and have a play in their playground.
 They had a gorgeous shady tree to sit under to eat our lunch and a great playground!
We even met some children with connections to Worser Bay School.
Oh what a day!! There were a few sleeping children on the way back to school.

We had so much to be grateful for: 
Stacey and Andrew inviting us to their farm.
The wonderful bus driver who drove us so calmly so none of us got sick.
The weather- it was a stunner!
Te Horo school principal, staff and children who made us feel so welcome.
Adventurous and fun parents who came on our trip and entered into the spirit of the day 
(see them in the truck and behind the tractor)!
And well behaved, curious, adventurous and appreciative students.
What a wonderful experience!
Thank you everyone who made it possible.



Monday, 4 December 2017

Teddy bears' picnic

Wow! What gorgeous weather we had for our teddy bears' picnic!
It was a great way to kick start our EOTC week.


Here are some thoughts for today:
The best part was when I was playing cricket - Freddie and Ben.
The best part was playing the parachut - Molly.
I love the walking part because it is peaceful - Georgia.
Being able to go sown there was  the best part - Greta.
The playing was the best part - Alex.
I liked how we are free, there was nothing we had to do, just do what we wanted - Nye.


Here are some photos....













Wednesday, 29 November 2017

African Dance--trying new things and growing our minds and bodies

We were lucky to have Naby visit us and teach us some traditional West African dance, drumming and singing.   First he showed us some dance, then we sang some songs, practised dancing and then learned a bit about the drums.  He showed us three different drumming sounds.  He explained that the sounds are like a family there is the deep sound which he called the Daddy, a slightly higher one that is called the Mommy and the highest sound was the baby.  
Each class had a turn at trying the dance and then the teachers did it too!  



The dancing and drumming were really good for our maths because we had to count the beats.  
1,2,3, 1,2,3, 1,2,3,4, 5,6,7,8







Learning about African Dance was really good for us to be able to see how different places, people and cultures sing and dance and for us to give something new a try.  Everyone did give it a try and we know that when we try new things we grow our brains! Music and dancing are also really great for our wellbeing and link to our positive health curriculum.  Singing and dancing out in the sunshine and with the birds was lots of fun and got us moving and grooving! 

Tuesday, 28 November 2017

Transition

On Fridays over the last few weeks we have been going to visit the area that we will be working in next year. Last Friday parents were invited to come to transition and it was lovely to see so many new parents. Thanks to all the children who came and introduced their parents to us. And thanks to all the parents who came to visit.

We have the POWER to ...

We have been thinking particularly hard this Inquiry into ways we can be powerful ourselves. We began by brainstorming all the ways we could use our power to change something for the better. 

Some of us decided to connect with others and use our power collectively and some of us have decided to work on more individual or personal matters.

Have a look at all the ways we can use our POWER ...














Grooving with Naby Bangoura!

On Tuesday we were super lucky to have Naby Bangoura visit Worser Bay School and teach us some traditional dancing.



Naby is a dance master from Guinea and is in NZ at the momment running some classes and workshops.


The whole school joined together on bottom court to learn some traditional dance moves and hear some wonderful drumming by Jennifer and her crew. We also found out the names of the special drums and the different sounds they make.


Thank you so much to Jennifer for organising the visit, Naby for teaching us some great dance moves and to the drummers for giving up their lunch time to provide us with some music.





Writing Workshops

This week our writers have been busy running workshops.

Today some of our writers ran workshops around punctuation, editing. using WOW words and similes, handwriting and letter sounds/blends.

   

The workshop leaders did a wonderful job of explaining their lesson focus and were patient, kind and encouraging to all those that attended their workshop. We were impressed with how many of our writers wanted to step up and lead a workshop.

    

At the end of our writing workshops we reflected on how they went and what we enjoyed about them. Here's what our writers thought:

"I liked being able to teach my friends things that I am good at".

"It was cool that my friend could teach me some things in writing that I find tricky".

"I wasn't sure if I wanted to lead a workshop but once I did, it was so much fun".

Tino pai rawa atu to all those leaders that led a workshop and to all our writers for collaborating and working respectfully with each other.